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Basic Exophoria | Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Exophoria is an eye condition that affects binocular vision and eye alignment. A person with exophoria will experience one of their eyes drifting outward, and their eyes will have difficulty working together.

Exophoria is usually diagnosed in childhood and is most noticeable when reading, studying, focusing on near objects or when one eye is covered.

What Causes Exophoria?

The exact cause isn’t yet known, but the problem usually lies in the eye muscles.

Research published in The American Orthoptic Journal suggests that when the eyes are under stress, the weaker eye reacts by drifting outwards.

What Are the Symptoms of Exophoria?

Aside from one of the eyes drifting outwards, common signs and symptoms of exophoria include:

  • Headaches
  • Sore or painful eyes
  • Poor reading/reading comprehension
  • Double vision
  • Tendency to close one eye
  • Difficulty sustaining focus on near objects
  • Temporary blurred vision
  • Poor hand-eye coordination
  • Poor depth perception
  • Light sensitivity
  • Motion sickness
  • Lack of overall coordination
  • General fatigue
  • Reduced productivity in the workplace or at home
  • Avoidance of visually demanding activities

How Is Exophoria Treated or Managed?

Managing exophoria involves minimizing symptoms, while treating exophoria targets the underlying cause of the problem.

In some cases of exophoria, specialized lenses or prisms are all it takes to manage symptoms and increase productivity.

But in the vast majority of cases, the most effective way to manage and treat exophoria is a personalized vision therapy program coupled with specialized lenses.

Vision therapy is a tailor-made set of eye exercises that help the eyes and brain work seamlessly as a team.

When it comes to exophoria, the goals of vision therapy are to:

  • Eventually reverse or minimize the exophoria
  • Enhance accommodative/convergence skills
  • Integrate binocular function with other sensory functions (like auditory, vestibular, and kinesthetic)
  • Enhance visual processing
  • Increase visual stamina and focusing abilities
  • Integrate binocular vision with motor skills

In most cases of exophoria, patients experience significant improvement after 30 hours of in-office vision therapy, but more visits may be necessary, depending on several factors.

What to Consider Before Starting Vision Therapy

Exophoria can present in mild to severe cases, and each patient will respond to treatment differently.

Some factors that influence the efficacy of vision therapy include, but are not limited to:

  • Patient’s willingness to participate and perform at-home exercises
  • Severity of the condition
  • Other health conditions or cognitive/developmental conditions
  • The amount of visually demanding activities the patient is involved with
  • The type and result of prior interventions

After completing a successful vision therapy program, follow up care can include occasional visits with your vision therapist to ensure long-term stability.

We Can Treat Your Exophoria And Other Visual Conditions

At The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision, our vision therapy team is highly experienced in diagnosing and treating a wide range of visual dysfunctions.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with exophoria or experiences any of its symptoms, contact us to schedule a functional visual evaluation. If we find a visual problem, we’ll guide you through the most suitable treatment options for long-lasting relief.

Call The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision to schedule an appointment today!

Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 417-238-0229
Learn More About Vision Therapy
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Dissociated Vertical Deviation

What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)?

DVD refers to a condition where the eyes have not developed the binocular coordination needed to work together. In DVD, one eye will tend to drift upward when not used or when the patient fixates with the other eye. The upward drift can occur in one or both eyes, and the amount of drift can differ. Aside from the most common upward drift seen in DVD, outward drift or rotation of one of the eyes can also occur.

Patients with dissociated vertical deviation (DVD), usually don’t notice blurred or double vision when their eye drifts upward. This is because the visual system suppresses the vision in the eye that drifts upward.

When and Why Does DVD Occur?

DVD tends to appear between ages 2- 3. Patients with early-onset strabismus (eye turns) are the most susceptible to eyes drifting apart. While the presence of DVD is strongly linked to a lack of 3D vision or depth perception, this condition may also develop following eye muscle surgery to correct strabismus.

What Are DVD Signs and Symptoms?

The signs and symptoms associated with dissociated vertical deviation may include, but are not limited to:

  • Abnormal working distance/abnormal postural adaptation
  • Deviation of one eye
  • Diplopia (double vision)
  • Eye turn
  • Inaccurate depth perception
  • Spatial disorientation

Can Dissociated Vertical Deviation Be Treated?

When DVD is severe and/or occurs frequently, vision therapy is often the most effective treatment.

Vision therapy is a customized program of eye exercises, prescription lenses and/or prisms aimed at enhancing the eyes’ ability to work together to reduce the incidence of upward drift.

If you or your child suspect you have it, or if you’ve already been diagnosed with DVD, contact The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision for assessment and customized treatment.

Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 417-238-0229
Learn More About Vision Therapy
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Anomalous Retinal Correspondence

To understand what anomalous retinal correspondence is, you first need to understand normal retinal correspondence.

Normal retinal correspondence (NRC) means the eyes are correctly positioned, with both eyes looking in the same direction, with no eye turn. In NRC, the central part of the retina of each eye, known as the fovea, is correctly positioned and sees the images the person is looking at.

In abnormal retinal correspondence (ARC) — also known as anomalous retinal correspondence — there is an eye turn, known as strabismus. In this situation, the fovea of the turned eye is not looking at the object. This would usually cause double vision, which is very disabling. To stop the double vision (diplopia), the brain ‘turns off the original fovea’ and creates a new point in your retina, called an extra-fovea or a faux-fovea, to compensate for the misalignment.

While this prevents double vision, it causes other vision problems.

Signs and Symptoms of ARC

The signs and symptoms associated with ARC may include, but are not limited to:

  • Eye turn
  • Absence of diplopia (seeing two images of the same thing)
  • Avoidance of eye contact
  • Avoidance of visually demanding tasks
  • Better than expected performance on tasks requiring binocular vision
  • Post-surgical increase in the angle of deviation

Treatment for Anomalous Retinal Correspondence

ARC requires a vision therapy program. While vision therapy may not totally cure ARC, it may substantially improve visual function and quality of life.

A vision therapy program trains the eyes and brain to work together more efficiently and quickly. It corrects certain eye alignment and other binocular vision problems.

Vision therapy includes specific eye exercises paired with special lenses, prisms or eye patches to help improve poor visual skills and binocular vision problems. The program is designed and supervised by your eye doctor.

To learn more or find out how you can strengthen your or your child’s visual skills, schedule an eye evaluation with The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision today.

Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 417-238-0229
Learn More About Vision Therapy
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Third Cranial Nerve Palsy

There are 12 pairs of cranial nerves that control most head and neck functions. These functions include swallowing, facial sensations, eye movements and other facial movements.

The third cranial nerve controls specific eye movements, certain pupil functions and upper eyelid function. If this nerve isn’t working properly on one or both sides of the head, this refers to ‘third nerve palsy.’

What is Third Nerve Palsy?

Third nerve palsy, also known as ‘oculomotor nerve palsy,’ occurs when the third cranial nerve is damaged by disease or injury.

The third cranial nerve controls the actions of four external eye muscles. These muscles are responsible for moving the eye upward and downward, rotating the eye outward and downward toward the ear and turning the eye inward.

The third cranial nerve also controls focusing abilities, upper eyelid position and pupil constriction.

Since many of the eye’s muscles are controlled by the third nerve, palsy of this nerve can result in partial or complete paralysis of the eye muscles.

Symptoms of third nerve palsy include:

  • An enlarged pupil that does not react normally to light
  • Double vision (diplopia)
  • Droopy eyelid (ptosis)
  • Eye misalignment (strabismus)
  • Tilted head to compensate for binocular vision difficulties

What Causes Third Nerve Palsy?

The most common causes of third nerve palsy include:

  • Birth trauma
  • Brain tumor
  • Aneurysm
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Head injury
  • Migraine
  • Infection
  • Vaccination

How is Third Nerve Palsy Treated?

Treatment depends on the underlying cause of the condition.

For example, surgery may be recommended if an aneurysm or tumor is pressing on the nerve, as it will help relieve the pressure on the nerve and promote healing.

In order to relieve double vision and eye misalignment, the following treatments may be recommended:

  • Vision therapy
  • Patching one eye to improve binocular vision
  • Prism lenses to reduce or eliminate double vision
  • Muscle surgery to realign the eyes
  • Eyelid surgery to correct the ptosis

Vision therapy is a customized program that is effective for some patients with third nerve palsy, as it can help to improve the control of eye movements and binocular vision.

If you notice any sudden changes in your vision, especially double vision or an eye turn, contact The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision to schedule your comprehensive eye exam as soon as possible.

Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 417-238-0229
Learn More About Vision Therapy
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Vision Therapy for Visual Processing Difficulties

Without good visual processing skills, the brain isn’t able to make sense of the world we see with our eyes. A child may have 20/20 vision but still struggle with understanding or remembering pictures, distances, or symbols.

A child’s ability to learn properly in the classroom, play sports and socialize with peers can be affected by visual processing deficits.

A child who has not developed good eye teaming, eye focusing and eye movement skills will often have more difficulty with visual processing skills. Fortunately, vision therapy can strengthen these skills..

What is Visual Processing Disorder?

Visual processing disorder impairs the brain’s ability to process the information sent to it by the eyes. This doesn’t mean your child’s eyesight isn’t clear. The problem is the brain’s inability to make perfect sense of the visual information sent to it via the visual system.

Signs and Symptoms of Visual Processing Disorder

There are certain signs or symptoms that indicate a child may have trouble with visual processing. These may include:

  • Difficulty distinguishing between similar shapes, letters or objects
  • Difficulty identifying an object when only parts of it are visible
  • Difficulty determining how close objects are to one another
  • Difficulty distinguishing a figure from its background
  • Frequent reversal of letters, numbers or words
  • Illegible handwriting
  • Trouble remembering what they’ve read or seen
  • Tendency to read the same line over and over or skip lines when reading
  • Trouble writing within the lines or copying from a book
  • Bumps into things when walking
  • Problems with organization
  • Poor retention of visual classroom material

Common Areas of Difficulty

Visual Memory

Visual memory allows for the immediate recollection of how letters, numbers, shapes or objects look. If a child can’t recall a sight word from one page to the next or has difficulty copying information from the board to their notebook, it’s often a sign that visual memory is impaired.

A child who struggles with comprehension often has issues related to visual memory.

Visual Sequential Memory

Visual sequential memory is the ability to remember listed items in the correct sequence. This is essential for both spelling and reading. A child who struggles to remember the order of letters, numbers or shapes in a series has visual sequential memory difficulties.

Visual Closure

Visual closure refers to the ability to [visualize] the complete whole when given incomplete information. For a child, this skill is important for reading fluency. This skill prevents a child from having to process every letter in every word. Instead, they are able to recognize a word by sight.

Visual Discrimination

Visual discrimination is an important skill for reading, writing, math and social interactions. It is the ability to detect differences in visual images. If a child has trouble recognizing slight differences, it can lead to confusion between two people, or words and letters, such as ‘saw’ and ‘was.’

Visual Form Constancy

Visual form constancy refers to the ability to mentally rotate or turn objects or [resize] a form in the mind in order to match a picture. This allows the child to recognize the shapes of letters and words, no matter their orientation.

Visual Figure-Ground

If a child struggles in this area, they will likely get overwhelmed by a page with a lot of words. This ability to distinguish an object from its background helps with reading skills.

How Does Vision Therapy Help?

A vision therapy treatment program can enhance visual-motor integration, visual memory, processing speed and more in order to improve a child’s visual processing skills and, in turn, help them to progress in the classroom and beyond.

If you suspect your child has a visual processing disorder, it may be time to have your child’s vision evaluated. Call The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision in Joplin to schedule an appointment today.

Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.
Book An Appointment
Call Us 417-238-0229
Learn More About Vision Therapy
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Retained Primitive Reflexes and Vision

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Retained Primitive Reflexes and Vision

The foundation of a child’s ability to develop and learn starts with their primitive reflexes. In their first few months of life, primitive reflexes — the reflex actions in the central nervous system — are critical for their brain development. To a parent, the child’s ability to crawl, grab with their fingers, to tilt or move their head seems very basic, all these require the infant to use these primitive reflexes.

In reality, these slight movements are signs of a healthy newborn. However, in the course of an infant’s brain development, they should lose these basic primitive reflexes and no longer display them after 5-7 months.

Retained primitive reflexes can result from a problem at birth or during those first few months of life. They can be noticed from something seemingly minor, like being slow to crawl, to something more severe, like a head injury or fall.

In reality, these slight movements are signs of a healthy newborn. In the course of a baby’s development, children should lose these basic primitive reflexes and no longer display them after 5-7 months.

    What Are Primitive Reflexes?

    Primitive reflexes are automatic/involuntary movements fundamental for the development of muscle tone, sensory integration, head control and overall development. As a baby grows, these primitive reflexes will slowly disappear as the infant’s brain develops and matures and the infant’s movements become more voluntary and controlled.

    Movement is crucial for the infant’s brain to integrate the primitive reflexes. Vision and movement go hand-in-hand in the integration of primitive reflexes allowing the infant to move through their world as they develop through the early childhood stages of life. From gross motor to fine motor to oculomotor movements, each stage of development is affected by the integration of primitive reflexes.

    What Causes Primitive Reflexes To Be Retained?

    There are many reasons which may contribute to primitive reflexes being retained or ‘active’.

    Retained primitive reflexes may be the result of:

    • Stress of the mother and/or baby during pregnancy
    • Lack of movement in utero
    • Restricted body movements, such as the infant spending extended time in car seats, carriers, walkers or jumpers
    • Illness, injury, trauma, chronic stress
    • Other developmental delays

    Reflexes that are integrated may become reactivated later due to trauma, injury, illness, or stress.

    It is important to address these missing developmental stages when primitive reflexes are not integrated. Fortunately, there are ways to retrain and assess the brain with the use of vision therapy, which ultimately creates the neural pathways necessary to integrate them.

    Vision Therapy and Primitive Reflexes

    Although there are many primitive reflexes, vision therapy programs focus on five reflexes that affect he development of the visual system.

    Moro Reflex

    Moro reflex is the earliest primitive reflex. It affects vestibular, ocular, motor and visual perceptual skills.

    Symptoms include:

    • Exaggerated startle reflex
    • Motion sickness
    • Eye movement and visual processing problems
    • Poor coordination
    • Poor balance
    • Light sensitivity
    • Frequent infections
    • Inner ear problems
    • Allergies
    • Poor stamina
    • Difficulty with black print on white paper
    • Tense muscle tone
    • Poor auditory discrimination
    • Biochemical and nutritional imbalances
    • Often in “Fight or Flight” mode
    • Hyperactivity
    • Low self-esteem

    Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex (TLR)

    TLR affects ocular, motor, balance, muscle tone and auditory discrimination.

    Symptoms include:

    • Poor posture and/or stooping
    • Weak muscle tone
    • Stiff or jerky movements
    • Toe walking
    • Dislike of sports
    • Eye movement, spatial and visual perceptual problems
    • Motion sickness
    • Poor balance
    • Poor organization skills
    • Poor sequencing skills
    • Poor coordination
    • Poor sense of time
    • Fear of heights

    Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (STNR)

    STNR affects fixation, focusing from far to near and crossing midline.

    Symptoms include:

    • Poor posture
    • Difficulty catching and/or tracking a ball
    • Poor depth perception and balance
    • Difficulty swimming
    • Poor hand-eye coordination
    • Messy eating
    • Difficulties with adjusting focus from far to near
    • Poor swimming skills
    • Learning problems
    • Difficulty aligning numbers for math problems
    • Difficulty recognizing social cues
    • ADD/ADHD characteristics
    • Anchors feet behind chair while sitting
    • “W” position when sitting on the floor

    Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex (ATNR)

    ATNR affects midline issues, eye tracking, balance, handwriting and laterality.

    Symptoms include:

    • Poor balance when moving head side to side
    • Focusing problems (especially when switching from near to distance)
    • Difficulty keeping place when copying
    • Difficulty learning to ride a bicycle
    • Difficulty crossing the midline
    • Poor pursuits (smooth eye movements)
    • Mixed laterality (uses right foot, left hand or uses right or left hand interchangeably)
    • Poor expression of ideas on paper
    • Difficulty catching a ball
    • Poor handwriting
    • ADD/ADHD characteristics

    Spinal Galant Reflex

    Spinal Galant reflex affects the ability to sit still, short-term memory, concentration problems and can lead to bedwetting.

    Symptoms include:

    • Bedwetting
    • Fidgety or wiggly (especially when sitting)
    • Sensory issues with food texture or tags or waistbands in clothing
    • Poor short-term memory
    • Poor concentration
    • ADHD characteristics

    How Does Vision Therapy Help?

    A vision therapy program provides exercises to address primitive reflexes. By using rhythmic movement training techniques that imitate the movements of an infant in development, patients are able to integrate these retained reflexes. These repetitive motions develop the reflexes and gradually help develop the front and visual cortex of the brain.

    Once these reflexes are integrated by the body, many behavioral issues affected by retained primitive reflexes become resolved. Since, vision is directly linked with the brain and is affected when our brains do not develop correctly, it is important to address the issue. By addressing these reflexes, a vision therapy program provides a comprehensive approach to resolving these problems.

    To learn more about vision therapy, contact The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision today.

    Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.
    Book An Appointment
    Call Us 417-238-0229
    Learn More About Vision Therapy
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    What Conditions Can Vision Therapy Help Treat?

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    Vision Therapy For Improved Reading Skills In Children

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    Exercises and Tools Used In Vision Therapy

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    Vision Therapy For Meniere’s Disease

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    Vision Therapy For Meniere’s Disease

    The body’s vestibular system consists of tiny structures within the inner ear that are responsible for maintaining balance and stability. This system works closely with the visual system and other receptors in the body to keep a person feeling orientated and balanced. When there is a problem in either the vestibular system or visual system, balance issues can occur.

    It can be difficult to pinpoint the root cause of symptoms, so if a person has been diagnosed with a vestibular balance disorder — like Meniere’s disease — it’s important to have their vision evaluated to rule out visual dysfunction as a possible secondary cause or contributer. Moreover, ensuring healthy visual functioning can minimize dizzy spells and other symptoms.

    What is Meniere’s Disease?

    Meniere’s disease is an inner ear disorder that can cause severe dizziness (vertigo), congestion in the ears, ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and hearing loss.

    A person can be diagnosed with Meniere’s disease at any age, but is often first diagnosed in adults between the ages of 40-60. It is considered a chronic condition and affects 650,000 North Americans each year.

    There are no definitive answers explaining why a person would develop Meniere’s disease, but it is believed that a viral infection, genetics, autoimmune reactions and improper drainage of ear fluid may play a role.

    How Vision Relates to Meniere’s Disease

    The vestibular system works very closely with the visual system to maintain steadiness. In fact, 70% of the sensory information that the brain receives is visual. Your eyes are largely responsible for telling your brain where you are in space in relation to other objects.

    Your brain must receive compatible information from all sensory receptors in order to feel secure and balanced. When visual information doesn’t line up with sensory information from other sources — like from the ears — dizziness, fogginess, nausea and fatigue can occur.

    For patients with visual dysfunction, developing and strengthening visual skills and improving the functioning of the visual system can greatly reduce feelings of dizziness and imbalance.

    How a Vision Therapist Can Help

    Anyone suffering from dizzy spells should have a functional visual assessment to measure all areas of visual functioning, especially depth and space perception. Even slight visual dysfunction, such as reduced visual skills or visual processing, can cause or exacerbate dizziness and other symptoms.

    It’s important to note that this type of visual assessment goes beyond that of a standard eye exam. Patients with 20/20 vision can still have problems with visual skills or processing that go undetected and undiagnosed for years.

    If visual dysfunction is found, your eye doctor may prescribe a personalized program of vision therapy. This form of therapy involves the use of specialized eye exercises, prisms and therapeutic lenses that recalibrate how the brain and eyes work together.

    Vision therapy also involves a tailor-made regimen of visual exercises that are performed in-office, as well as between office sessions, as an at-home component to treatment.

    If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with a balance disorder like Meniere’s disease, or has gone through vestibular rehabilitation with no improvement, speak with Dr. David Coleman and Dr. Jeff Coleman about the benefits of vision therapy.

    Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.

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    Nystagmus and Vision Therapy

    Nystagmus is an eye condition characterized by rapid, uncontrolled eye movements from side to side, up and down, or in circles. This condition can begin in infancy or develop later in life.

    People with nystagmus tend to have problems with depth perception, struggle to identify moving objects or people and experience difficulties with balance and night vision. Their head might tilt due to a ‘null point’, this is a head position where the eye movements are reduced, so tilting the head allows more comfortable vision.

    Nystagmus is caused by the brain’s inability to control eye movements and may be a symptom of other eye conditions (such as severe myopia, astigmatism and congenital cataracts) or medical problems (such as brain abnormalities, inner-ear inflammation, central-nervous-system diseases, medication side effects and albinism). Eyesight may vary, depending at what age nystagmus began. Adults may also exhibit signs of nystagmus due to multiple sclerosis or after experiencing a TIA (transient ischemic attack) or stroke.

    Diagnosing nystagmus starts with an in-depth eye examination to evaluate the eyes’ ability to focus, move vertically and horizontally, work as a team and shift focus from object to object. Eyeglasses or contact lenses do not fully correct the condition, but at least being able to see more clearly may alleviate some of the symptoms. Because nystagmus is frequently related to other medical issues, patients are often referred to a variety of health care providers, including general practitioners, neurologists, or otorhinolaryngologists (ENTs).

    Nystagmus and Vision Therapy

    Vision therapy can help many patients with nystagmus. Vision Therapy is a customized program of visual exercises taught in our office and continued by the patient at home. Vision therapy trains the eyes to work together and master the necessary visual skills – including both eyes moving and working together to track shifting objects, whether far away, closeby, or on the periphery of the visual field.

    For example, vision therapy can train the eyes to move together across a page to fixate on one word and then another. Doing so can make reading a more comfortable activity and boost reading comprehension.

    Vision therapy can help some patients with nystagmus to reduce or slow their eye movements, improve focus, enable eye contact with another person and reduce fatigue while reading. Some nystagmus patients benefit from vision therapy which also includes prism, multifocal or bifocal lenses.

    Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.

     

    References:

     

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    Vision Therapy for Anisometropia

    What is Anisometropia?

    Anisometropia is a condition in which the eyes have significantly different refractive power: One eye sees very well while the other doesn’t. This discrepancy causes the brain to receive two very different images, resulting in eye strain, squinting and headaches. Anisometropia can lead to a serious condition, amblyopia, also known as “lazy eye” that causes the brain to compensate for the imbalance by essentially ignoring one eye and seeing solely with the other eye.

    When the brain ignores one eye, communication between that eye and the brain becomes much weaker — a problem that should be addressed immediately by contacting Dr. David Coleman and Dr. Jeff Coleman.

    Anisometropia can result from:

    • A large difference in the optical prescription between the two eyes
    • Strabismus, with the eyes not aligning properly
    • Accommodation difficulties, with one eye doing more of the focusing
    • Ptosis, when the upper eyelid droops and blocks vision
    • Diseases affecting the eyes or surrounding ocular structures
    • Detached retina

    This condition also can occur when the eyes are not the same size, shape, or curvature. As a result, when a person looks at an object, each eye perceives the object with significant differences, causing visual disturbances such as blurry or double vision.

    What Can be Done About Anisometropia?

    If the visual acuity difference between the two eyes vary widely, this may not be fully correctable with eyeglasses. However, contact lenses may prove to be more effective as they sit directly on the eyes, providing a more comfortable solution. LASIK surgery may also be an option.

    During childhood, anisometropia can be successfully addressed through vision therapy, which is a personalized program of exercises managed by Dr. David Coleman and Dr. Jeff Coleman. Vision therapy for children with anisometropia might include the following:

    • Customized exercises to stimulate the brain’s connection with the weaker eye
    • Wearing a patch over the favored eye so the child has no choice but to see with the weaker eye
    • Wearing glasses with prism lenses while reading, in school, doing homework, watching TV, or playing video games
    • Eye drops that temporarily blur the favored eye, leaving the child no option but to use on the weaker eye.
    Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.

    References:

     

    Book An Appointment
    Call Us 417-238-0229
    Learn More About Vision Therapy
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    Symptoms Indicating A Visual Efficiency Problem

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    What Conditions Can Vision Therapy Help Treat?

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    Vision Therapy For Improved Reading Skills In Children

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    Vision Problems and Autism

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a range of childhood developmental conditions characterized by social, behavioral and communication deficits. About 1 in 54 children are affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to the Centers for Disease Control’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network. The condition is more prevalent in boys than it is in girls.

    Many people with ASD experience a range of problems with their visual system. It has been observed that some infants as young as 2-6 months of age — who are later diagnosed with ASD — are unable to make eye contact with people. Furthermore, research shows that children with ASD present with a 21-50% higher incidence of strabismus (or eye turn) compared to children without ASD.

    Below we’ll delve into more problems with visual processing among those with ASD and explain how vision therapy can help them improve their vision skills.

    Eye Exams in Children with Autism

    While vision problems are common in children with autism, they can often go undiagnosed. It is crucial for parents to understand that children with ASD need to have regular eye exams in order to assess their ocular health, visual skills and vision acuity.

    [Eye doctors] recommend that children with autism undergo a functional visual evaluation in order to assess their visual skills and many other important aspects of the visual system, including:

    • Eye movements
    • Eye teaming
    • Eye-tracking
    • Convergence
    • Visual processing
    • Visual-spatial judgment
    • Central/peripheral vision

    Common Visual Problems and Behaviors Among Those With Autism

    Vision problems, particularly visual-spatial misperceptions related to how bodies and objects move through space, can cause a child with ASD to feel anxious, confused, or distressed—resulting in certain behavioral responses.

    As you’ll see in the list below, many autistic behaviors may seem unrelated to vision problems, when in truth, some may actually be caused or exacerbated by poor visual skills.

    • Poor eye contact
    • Looking beyond/through objects
    • Extreme fear of heights or an absence of appropriate fear of heights
    • Inability to accurately track moving objects.
    • Problems with eye alignment (eye turns)
    • Amblyopia/lazy eye
    • Light sensitivity
    • Head-turning (looking at objects from the side of the eyes)
    • Rolling eyes
    • Visual stimming (flapping fingers in front of eyes)

    Vision Therapy for Children with Autism

    Vision therapy is a highly effective, personalized treatment method designed to enhance visual skills and the neurological connections between the eyes and brain. A vision therapy program for a child with ASD will facilitate improved visual processing, enabling them to better understand their surroundings. This, in turn, can lower their anxiety and boost their ability to verbalize and socialize. Each therapy program is custom-fit to the specific needs of the child, and includes age-appropriate exercises and activities.

    Common vision therapy goals for children with ASD include the improvement of:

    • Visual-spatial organization
    • Binocular vision
    • Eye-tracking
    • Focusing
    • Visual information processing

    If your child has autism and displays behaviors that may be associated with a vision condition, contact The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision to schedule a comprehensive functional eye exam for a proper diagnosis. We will prescribe a vision therapy program to help improve the quality of your child’s vision and, consequently, his or her quality of life.

    How Prism Lenses (Yoked Prisms or Ambient Prisms) Help

    Prism lenses help autistic children use their vision in a way that impacts other aspects of their well-being. For example, prisms can create immediate improvements in posture, balance and attention —significantly increasing the child’s feelings of physical safety and comfort, while decreasing anxiety, sensory overload and more.

    Prism lenses can be worn daily or just for the duration of a vision therapy program, and often produce significant visual improvements.

    How We Can Help

    Vision therapy is an evidence-based program clinically proven of many decades to be effective in developing critical neuro-visual skills in patients with autism. For optimal results, vision therapy should be an integral part of any interdisciplinary approach to improve the patient’s ability to function and quality of life.

    At The Vision Therapy Center At Coleman Vision, Dr. David Coleman and Dr. Jeff Coleman will provide your child with a program suited to his or her unique abilities and needs. Our goal is to help those with autism spectrum disorder perform daily tasks with ease, while diminishing the burden on themselves and those around them.

    Our practice serves patients from Joplin, Rogers, Miami, OK, and Springfield , Missouri and surrounding communities.
    Book An Appointment
    Call Us 417-238-0229
    Learn More About Vision Therapy
    Symptoms Indicating A Visual Efficiency Problem Thumbnail.jpg

    Symptoms Indicating A Visual Efficiency Problem

    What Conditions Can Vision Therapy Help Treat Thumbnail.jpg

    What Conditions Can Vision Therapy Help Treat?

    Thumbnail Kids.jpg

    Vision Therapy Blog

    Vision Therapy Can Improve Reading Skills In Children Thumbnail.jpg

    Vision Therapy For Improved Reading Skills In Children

    Exercises and Tools Used In Vision Therapy Thumbnail.jpg

    Exercises and Tools Used In Vision Therapy

    Read Our Latest Posts
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    Should My Child Have Vision Therapy 640×350 1.jpg

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    Toys and Games to Help Your Child Succeed in School

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